Maundy Thursday Reflections

Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem started with the adoring, cheering crowds on Palm Sunday, who then decried him on Holy Thursday, witnessed His cruel death on the cross. But Holy Week ends with Jesus’ glorious resurrection on Easter Day, which is our hope that the will to love, when empowered by the grace and mercy of God, will always, always, always triumph over fear.

Lenten reflections: Jesus’ 3 temptations & social justice

Our reflections on Jesus’ temptations and his responses should lead us to acknowledge that the fulfilment of our human needs is a legitimate pursuit, but not at the expense of others.  The best way to do this is to be advocates and active participants in the quest for social justice. 

Lifting the veil.  Living in love.

The transfiguration is the literal depiction of how love, personified in Jesus, rises above the limitations of the law, and removes the veil of political correctness, racial tolerance, indifference, race, religion, gender, and all the other things that influence the way we view and treat ‘other’ people. That, dear sisters and brothers in Christ, is the connection between Jesus’ transfiguration and the stories we tell during Black History Month.

STORYTELLING & RECONCILIATION

Storytelling can be hard.  It is uncomfortable to recount the acts of injustice, the cruelty of slavery and the complex issues of race relations.  It is important to tell the story of Black people as it is intertwined with the story of all of us here in North America.  And yes, telling the story of slavery is still relevant as we are living with the legacy of slavery.

TRUTH, DECEPTION & CHOICE

The shameful history of racism against Black people in the Worldwide Anglican Church is well documented.  The Anglican Church was part of the oppressive colonial government institutions and made no attempt prior to the early to mid-19th century to declare abhorrence of slavery and racial discrimination.  It was only in 2006, less than 20 years ago, that the Anglican Church through the Archbishop of Canterbury finally faced the truth of its history and issued a formal apology for the role it played in slavery and the consequent oppression of Black people in the Caribbean.

Picking the right battles. Winning the fight against racism.

Many of us find it very uncomfortable to listen to the facts and take action to redress racism. Sometimes guilt, pain and personal agendas are involved in the positions taken. Focus on solutions to make the world a better place by providing comfortable spaces for all of us.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

“Philanthropy is commendable but it must not cause the philanthropist to overlook the circumstances of economic injustice which make philanthropy necessary.” Let us remember that there is so much more work to do! #martinlutherking#martinlutherkingjr Christ in you, the hope of glory. That’s why glory matters. @glorymatters camilleisaacsmorell.com

Supporting formerly incarcerated persons in Montreal

Open Door. From the Inside Out. is a book published by Communitas Montreal, an organization that uses restorative justice to assist persons who have been incarcerated reintegrate into society.

Closure

Even if we are bearing the wounds in the aftermath of our good intentions and actions in 2021, we must be unwavering in our commitment to God’s plan for our lives. Say to yourself: “I will let nothing, or no one upset the calm peace of my soul,” and mean it.

My Tribute To Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Bishop Tutu was unapologetic in the defense of the rights of all people, yet as chairman of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, he is widely known for his insistence on forgiveness and public apology as the way forward in the aftermath of apartheid.